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Appears in collections : Research School, CEMRACS - Summer school: Numerical and mathematical modeling for biological and medical applications: deterministic, probabilistic and statistical descriptions / CEMRACS - École d'été : Modélisation numérique et mathématique pour la biologie et la médecine : descriptions déterministes, probabilistes et statistiques, Ecoles de recherche

Emergence is a process by which coherent structures arise through interactions among elementary entities without being directly encoded in these interactions. In this course, we will address some of the key questions of emergence such as the deciphering of the hidden relation between individual behavior and emergent structures. We will start with presenting biologically relevant examples of microscopic individual-based models (IBM). Then, we will develop a systematic coarse-graining approach and derive corresponding coarse-grained models (CGM) using mathematical kinetic theory as the key methodology. We will highlight that novel kinetic theory concepts need to be developed as new mathematical problems arise with emergent systems such as the lack of conservations, the build-up of correlations, or the presence of phase transitions (or bifurcations). Our goal is to show how kinetic theory can be used to provide better understanding of emergence phenomena taking place in a wide variety of biological contexts.

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Citation data

  • DOI 10.24350/CIRM.V.19423303
  • Cite this video Degond Pierre (7/20/18). A new continuum theory for incompressible swelling materials. CIRM. Audiovisual resource. DOI: 10.24350/CIRM.V.19423303
  • URL https://dx.doi.org/10.24350/CIRM.V.19423303

Bibliography

  • Degond, P., Ferreira, M.A., Merino-Aceituno, S., & Nahon, M. (2017). A new continuum theory for incompressible swelling materials. <arXiv:1707.02166> - https://arxiv.org/abs/1707.02166

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